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Flying Tigers Commander Claire Chennault, Kunming, China, 1942

Flying Tigers Commander Claire Chennault, Kunming, China, 1942

Taken on 1942-01-01

"By December 23, 1940, upon approval by the War Department, State Department and the President of the United States, an agreement was reached to provide China the 100 P-40B Tomahawk aircraft which had originally been built for Britain, but which the British were persuaded to give up in preference for newer models rapidly being built. With an agreement reached, General Mow returned to China aboard the SS Lurline, departing from Los Angeles on January 24, 1941. Chennault followed shortly after with a promise from the War Department and President Roosevelt to be delivered to Chiang Kai-shek that several shipments of P-40C fighters were forthcoming along with pilots, mechanics, and aviation supplies." Date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-13

Flying Tigers Pilot, Asian Theatre, World War II

Flying Tigers Pilot, Asian Theatre, World War II

Taken on 1942-01-01

"Flight leader and fighter ace Robert "R.T." Smith stands next to his P-40 fighter at Kunming, China. The “Flying Tiger” insignia was created by the Walt Disney Company."

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-13

Flying Tigers, Asian Theatre, World War II

Flying Tigers, Asian Theatre, World War II

Taken on 1941-12-01

"The 1st American Volunteer Group (AVG) of the Chinese Air Force in 1941–1942, nicknamed the Flying Tigers, was composed of pilots from the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC), Navy (USN), and Marine Corps (USMC), recruited under presidential authority and commanded by Claire Lee Chennault. The ground crew and headquarters staff were likewise mostly recruited from the U.S. military, along with some civilians." Date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-13

Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek of the Republic of China

Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek of the Republic of China

Taken on 1940-01-01

Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek was the dominant political force in the Republic of China throughout the 1930s and 1940s, playing a prominent role in World War II, the Second Sino-Japanese War, and the Chinese Civil War. After the ROC's expulsion from Mainland China, he continued to lead from Taiwan until his death in 1975. Date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-08

Newly Trained Chinese Troops March to the Front, China, 1939

Newly Trained Chinese Troops March to the Front, China, 1939

Taken on 1939-01-01

"The [National Revolutionary Army] was founded by the KMT in 1925 as the military force destined to unite China in the Northern Expedition. Organized with the help of the Comintern and guided under the doctrine of the Three Principles of the People, the distinction among party, state, and army was often blurred. A large number of the Army's officers passed through the Whampoa Military Academy, and the first commandant, Chiang Kai-shek, became commander-in-chief of the Army in 1925 before launching the successful Northern Expedition. Aside from Chiang Kai-shek himself, other prominent commanders in the National Revolutionary Army included Du Yuming and Chen Cheng."

Source: informationwar.org/Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-10

Two Tibetan Dob-Dob Warrior Monks in Lhasa, 1938

Two Tibetan Dob-Dob Warrior Monks in Lhasa, 1938

Taken on 1938-06-30

Two dob-dobs in Lhasa. (Date Unknown) Tibetan monasteries had populations rivaling Tibet's largest cities, and had their own armies of dob-dobs ("warrior monks").

Source: Bundesarchiv Bild 135-KB-09-048

Uploaded by SamiGoat on 2014-08-27

Chinese Civilians Being Buried Alive by Japanese, Nanjing, China, Late 1937/Early 1938

Chinese Civilians Being Buried Alive by Japanese, Nanjing, China, Late 1937/Early 1938

Taken on 1938-01-01

"Although the Nanking Massacre is generally described as having occurred over a six-week period after the fall of Nanking, the crimes committed by the Japanese army were not limited to that period. Many atrocities were reported to have been committed as the Japanese army advanced from Shanghai to Nanking. According to one Japanese journalist embedded with Imperial forces at the time, "The reason that the [10th Army] is advancing to Nanking quite rapidly is due to the tacit consent among the officers and men that they could loot and rape as they wish." Date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-07

Soviet Built I-16 with Chinese Insignia, China, Late-1930s

Soviet Built I-16 with Chinese Insignia, China, Late-1930s

Taken on 1938-01-01

"After the signing of the Anti-Comintern Pact between Germany and Japan, the Soviet Union hoped to keep China in the war as a way of deterring the Japanese from invading Siberia, thus saving itself from the threat of a two-front war. In September 1937, the Soviet leadership signed the Sino-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact and approved Operation Zet, the formation of a Soviet volunteer air force. As part of this secret operation, Soviet technicians upgraded and ran some of China's transportation systems. Bombers, fighters, supplies and advisors arrived, including Soviet general Vasily Chuikov, the future victor of the Battle of Stalingrad."

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-10

Japanese General Iwane Matsui Rides Into Nanjing, China, December 1937

Japanese General Iwane Matsui Rides Into Nanjing, China, December 1937

Taken on 1937-12-08

"Concerning atrocities in Nanking, Matsui wrote in his war journal about rapes (20 December) and looting (29 December) and wrote it was very much regrettable that these behaviours destroyed the reputation of the Imperial Japanese Army. He also mentioned "a number of abominable incidents within the past 50 days" at the memorial service for the war-dead of the SEF held on 7 February and rebuked, in tears, the officers and the soldiers in the place, saying that atrocities done by a part of the army had damaged the reputation of the empire, such a thing should not happen in the Imperial Army, they should maintain discipline strictly and should never persecute innocent people, and so on." Exact date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-11

Young Chinese Victim of Nanjing Massacre, China, December 1937-January 1938

Young Chinese Victim of Nanjing Massacre, China, December 1937-January 1938

Taken on 1937-12-06

"In Nanking Massacre, a boy was killed by a Japanese soldier with the butt of a rifle, because he didn't take off his hat." Exact date unknown.

Source: neworiental.org/Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-11

Imperial Japanese Soldiers Advancing on Shanghai

Imperial Japanese Soldiers Advancing on Shanghai

Taken on 1937-08-13

Japanese Imperial Army soldiers during the Battle of Shanghai, 1937.

Source: Unkown - Blueshirts/Wikipedia

Uploaded by SATest on 2014-06-24

Japanese Special Naval Landing Forces, Battle of Shanghai, China, August 1937

Japanese Special Naval Landing Forces, Battle of Shanghai, China, August 1937

Taken on 1937-08-03

"Japanese Special Naval Landing Forces with gas masks and rubber gloves...near Chapei in the Battle of Shanghai."

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-10

Chiang Kai-shek Announcing Policy of Resistance Against Japan, Lushan, China, July 1937

Chiang Kai-shek Announcing Policy of Resistance Against Japan, Lushan, China, July 1937

Taken on 1937-07-10

"Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek announced the Kuomintang policy of resistance against Japan at Lushan on July 10, 1937, three days after the Marco Polo Bridge Incident."

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-08

Chinese Troops in House to House Fighting, Battle of Tai'erzhuang, China, Spring 1937

Chinese Troops in House to House Fighting, Battle of Tai'erzhuang, China, Spring 1937

Taken on 1937-03-31

"The Battle of Tai'erzhuang (simplified Chinese: 台儿庄会战; traditional Chinese: 臺兒莊會戰; pinyin: Tái'érzhūang Huìzhàn) was a battle of the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1938, between armies of the Republic of China and Japan, and is sometimes considered a part of the Battle of Xuzhou. The battle was the first major Chinese victory of the war. It humiliated the Japanese military and its reputation as an invincible force; for the Chinese it represented a tremendous morale boost."

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-08

Chinese Muslim Cavalry of the National Revolutionary Army

Chinese Muslim Cavalry of the National Revolutionary Army

Taken on 1937-01-01

"Despite the poor views given by European observers on the European trained Divisions, the Muslim Divisions of the National Revolutionary Army, trained in China, not by westerners, and led by the Ma Clique Muslim Generals, frightened the European observers with their appearance and fighting skills in battle. Europeans like Sven Hedin and Georg Vasel were in awe of the appearance Chinese Muslim NRA divisions made and their ferocious combat abilities. They were trained in harsh, brutal conditions. The 36th Division (National Revolutionary Army), trained entirely in China, without any European help, was composed of Chinese Muslims, fought against and severely mauled an invading Soviet Russian army during the Soviet Invasion of Xinjiang. The division was inferior in technology and manpower, but slammed the superior Russian force." Date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-10

Chinese Muslim Hui Soldiers, China

Chinese Muslim Hui Soldiers, China

Taken on 1933-01-01

"According to Wan Lei, "Statistics showed that the Japanese destroyed 220 mosques and killed countless Hui people by April 1941." After the Rape of Nanking mosques in Nanjing were found to be filled with dead bodies. They also followed a policy of economic oppression which involved the destruction of mosques and Hui communities and made many Hui jobless and homeless. Another policy was one of deliberate humiliation. This included soldiers smearing mosques with pork fat, forcing Hui to butcher pigs to feed the soldiers, and forcing girls to supposedly train as geishas and singers but in fact made them serve as sex slaves. Hui cemeteries were destroyed for military reasons. Many Hui fought in the war against Japan such as Bai Chongxi, Ma Hongbin, Ma Hongkui, Ma Bufang, Ma Zhanshan, Ma Biao, Ma Zhongying, Ma Buqing and Ma Hushan." Date unknown.

Source: Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-10

Japanese Cavalry Entering Shenyang, Manchuria, September 1931

Japanese Cavalry Entering Shenyang, Manchuria, September 1931

Taken on 1931-09-18

"Japan saw Manchuria as a limitless supply of raw materials, a market for its manufactured goods (now excluded from the influence of many Western countries in Depression era tariffs), and as a protective buffer state against the Soviet Union in Siberia. Japan invaded Manchuria outright after the Mukden Incident (simplified Chinese: 九一八事变; traditional Chinese: 九一八事變; pinyin: Jiǔyībā Shìbiàn) in September 1931."

Source: japanfocus.org/Wikipedia

Uploaded by northway on 2014-09-08

Chinese Boxer Rebellion General Dong Fuxiang

Chinese Boxer Rebellion General Dong Fuxiang

Taken on 1908-01-01

Chinese General Dong Fuxiang was overtly hostile towards foreigners during the Boxer Rebellion.

Source: http://www.ueren.com/person/view_e83845e0df504bbbb56d0db4f72af07d.shtml

Uploaded by northway on 2014-07-31

Fallen Japanese Soldiers in Port Arthur

Fallen Japanese Soldiers in Port Arthur

Taken on 1905-06-06

Russian soldiers looking down at a trench filled with corpses of Japanese soldiers, Port Arthur

Source: Wikipedia/Underwood & Underwood, Inc.

Uploaded by mfa1988 on 2014-07-10

Japanese Fleet Russo War

Japanese Fleet Russo War

Taken on 1905-05-27

Japanese fleet proceeding toward the enemy

Source: Wikipedia/関 重忠(東京:博文館)

Uploaded by mfa1988 on 2014-07-10

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