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Apartheid in South Africa - UN Archive Photos; South Africa, 1960's - 1980's

Apartheid in South Africa - UN Archive Photos; South Africa, 1960's - 1980's

Taken on 2016-01-23 *

"Apartheid became the official policy of the Government of South Africa in 1948, following the election of the Herenigde Nasionale Party, later renamed the National Party. Under this policy, racial discrimination was institutionalized. The lives of the Africans, who made up almost 75 per cent of the population, were controlled by the unjust segregation laws from birth to the grave. They were proscribed where to live, who to marry and the type of education they would receive in the country of their birth. Since the founding of the African National Congress (ANC) in 1912, the Africans waged the struggle against the unjust racist laws of South Africa. Their resistance ushered a new era on the morning of 21 March 1960, when thousands of Africans gathered peacefully in locations around the country, including in Sharpeville where up to 20,000 marched to the police station against the pass laws. The police opened fire on them, killing 67 people and wounding 186 others, including 40 women and 8 children. More than 80 per cent of them were shot in the back while fleeing. During the declaration of the state of emergency in 1960, which continued intermittently for nearly 30 years, anyone could be detained without a hearing by a low-level police official for up to six months. Thousands of individuals died in custody, frequently after gruesome acts of torture. Those who were tried were sentenced to death, banished, or imprisoned for life, as was the case with the world's most famous prisoner, Nelson Mandela. The issue of the policies of apartheid of the Government of South Africa remained on the agenda of the United Nations for almost fifty years. After numerous efforts of urging the Government of that country to abandon its policies - declared a crime against humanity - the international campaign reached a watershed in 1989. That year, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa, paving the way for the holding of the April 1994 historic and first-ever democratic elections in South Africa. The United Nations Photo Library (http://www.un.org/av/photo/) holds a collection of approximately 800,000 photographs dating back to the mid-1940s chronicling the history of the Organization and its work. The collection includes coverage of historic UN meetings and events, as well as a wide array of field coverage from its earliest days." https://www.flickr.com/photos/un_photo/albums/72157614394196

Source: UN/Flickr

Uploaded by RFrost on 2016-01-23

Hector Pieterson Memorial, Soweto, South Africa, Jan 2015

Hector Pieterson Memorial, Soweto, South Africa, Jan 2015

Taken on 2015-01-16

Monument in honor of the Soweto uprising of 1976

Uploaded by ogkzebs on 2015-03-02

South African Communist Party Posters, Jan 2015

South African Communist Party Posters, Jan 2015

Taken on 2015-01-16

Invoking the sacred name of Mandela to garner votes for the South African Communist Party in Soweto.

Uploaded by ogkzebs on 2015-03-02

Blockhouse Near Wolseley

Blockhouse Near Wolseley

Taken on 2006-04-20

British forces built blockhouses like the above to protect their supply lines from marauding Boer guerillas.

Source: Danie van der Merwe/Flickr

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

Frederik de Klerk with Nelson Mandela 1992

Frederik de Klerk with Nelson Mandela 1992

Taken on 1992-01-15

Frederik de Klerk and Nelson Mandela shake hands at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum held in Davos in January 1992.

Source: World Economic Forum

Uploaded by MicroscopeLens on 2014-06-09

Hector Pieterson Death, Soweto, Jun 1976

Hector Pieterson Death, Soweto, Jun 1976

Taken on 1976-06-16

Antoinette Sithole and Mbuyisa Makhubo carrying and 12-year-old Hector Pieterson moments after he was shot by South African police during a peaceful student demonstration in Soweto, South Africa

Source: Dzambukira, Proud/Wikipedia

Uploaded by mfa1988 on 2015-01-11

Lieutenant-General Lord Robert Baden-Powell

Lieutenant-General Lord Robert Baden-Powell

Taken on 1919-01-01

Lieutenant-General Lord Robert Baden-Powell commanded the British defense during the Siege of Mafeking.

Source: Anonymous

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

Canadian Boer War Veterans

Canadian Boer War Veterans

Taken on 1908-06-01

Canadian veterans of the Second Boer War celebrate the unveiling of the South African War Memorial in Toronto.

Source: City of Toronto Archives

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Human Rights Campaigner Emily Hobhouse

Human Rights Campaigner Emily Hobhouse

Taken on 1902-08-01

British-born Emily Hobhouse campaigned to improved the horrendous conditions of Britain's concentration camps during the Second Boer War.

Source: National Portrait Gallery, London

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Canadian Troops Returning From the Second Boer War

Canadian Troops Returning From the Second Boer War

Taken on 1901-06-05

Canadian Troops Returning From the Second Boer War

Source: City of Toronto Archives

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Burning Boer Homestead

Burning Boer Homestead

Taken on 1901-01-01

The British employed a scorched earth policy in response to Boer guerrilla actions.

Source: unknown

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Bloemfontein Concentration Camp

Bloemfontein Concentration Camp

Taken on 1901-01-01

Concentration camps in the Second Boer War were initially refugee camps for persons displaced by the war. Ultimately, these camps turned into concentration camps as victims of the British scorched earth campaign, many of them women and children, were forced off their land and into collective camps. Subpar living conditions corresponded with the camps' altered purpose, and many internees died.

Source: National Archives UK Flickr

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Women and Children Boer Internees

Women and Children Boer Internees

Taken on 1901-01-01

Boer women and children in a British internment camp. Conditions in such camps were poor and may internees died.

Source: UK Government

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Starving Boer Child

Starving Boer Child

Taken on 1901-01-01

Lizzie Van Zyl (pictured), a Boer, starved and eventually died in a British concentration camp during the Second Boer War.

Source: Unknown

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

Boer Commandos

Boer Commandos

Taken on 1900-01-01

Boer Commandos

Source: Project Gutenberg

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

Transvaal President Paul Kruger

Transvaal President Paul Kruger

Taken on 1900-01-01

Paul Kruger served as president of the South African Republic, also known as the Transvaal, during the Second Boer War.

Source: Unknown

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

Boer General Peter de Wet

Boer General Peter de Wet

Taken on 1900-01-01

Boer General Peter de Wet

Source: Gutenberg Project

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

South African Republic General Piet Cronjé

South African Republic General Piet Cronjé

Taken on 1900-01-01

South African Republic General Piet Cronjé

Source: Provincial Archives of the Free State, Collection Dr. Hendrik Muller, photo collection no. VA2863

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

Transit Point for Boer POWs

Transit Point for Boer POWs

Taken on 1900-01-01

The Second Boer War saw Boer POWs dispersed widely throughout the British Empire after first being processed through transit camps like the one above.

Source: anonymous

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-01

Horse Being Unloaded During Boer War

Horse Being Unloaded During Boer War

Taken on 1900-01-01

Horse Being Unloaded During Boer War

Source: Archive.org

Uploaded by northway on 2014-08-02

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