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Chadian Refugees

Chadian Refugees

Taken on 2011-06-26

An estimated 300,000 Chadians had lived in Libya. Many tried to return to Chad, through Egypt or Tunisia or just by crossing the desert. They reached the border exhausted and in desperate need of help. With an additional €10 million from ECHO complex evacuation operations were mounted and aid was also provided to help Chadians resettle. Photo: ECHO/B. Spadicini

Source: European Commission DG ECHO

Uploaded by mfa1988 on 2013-11-25

Darfurian Refugee Camp in Chad, March 2005

Darfurian Refugee Camp in Chad, March 2005

Taken on 2005-03-29

Darfur refugee camp, Chad, taken 29 March 2005. The camp sheltered those forced to flee Darfur due to the conflict there.

Source: Mark Knobil/Wikimedia

Uploaded by Improbability on 2015-06-20

Chadian Toyota during the Toyota War with Libya (Date Unknown)

Chadian Toyota during the Toyota War with Libya (Date Unknown)

Taken on 1987-01-01

Chadian soldiers on a Toyota Landcruiser pickup truck. The Toyota War is the name commonly given to the last phase of the Chadian–Libyan conflict, which took place in 1987 in Northern Chad and on the Libyan-Chadian border. It takes its name from the Toyota pickup trucks used as technicals to provide mobility for the Chadian troops as they fought against the Libyans. The 1987 war resulted in a heavy defeat for Libya, which, according to American sources, lost one tenth of its army, with 7,500 men killed and US$1.5 billion worth of military equipment destroyed or captured. Chadian losses were 1,000 men killed.

Source: Beao/Wikipedia

Uploaded by SamiGoat on 2014-09-09

Libyan Aircraft at Faya Largeau during War with Chad (Date Unknown)

Libyan Aircraft at Faya Largeau during War with Chad (Date Unknown)

Taken on 1985-01-01

LARAF MiG-23MS with empty missile rails rolling along the runway at Faya Largeau AB, sometimes in mid-1980s. Notice also the radome of an Il-76MD in the foreground left. Faya Largeau was the main Libyan base in northern Chad until the building of Ouadi Doum.

Source: US DoD

Uploaded by SamiGoat on 2014-09-09