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Apartheid in South Africa - UN Archive Photos; South Africa, 1960's - 1980's

Apartheid in South Africa - UN Archive Photos; South Africa, 1960's - 1980's

Taken on 2016-01-23 *

"Apartheid became the official policy of the Government of South Africa in 1948, following the election of the Herenigde Nasionale Party, later renamed the National Party. Under this policy, racial discrimination was institutionalized. The lives of the Africans, who made up almost 75 per cent of the population, were controlled by the unjust segregation laws from birth to the grave. They were proscribed where to live, who to marry and the type of education they would receive in the country of their birth. Since the founding of the African National Congress (ANC) in 1912, the Africans waged the struggle against the unjust racist laws of South Africa. Their resistance ushered a new era on the morning of 21 March 1960, when thousands of Africans gathered peacefully in locations around the country, including in Sharpeville where up to 20,000 marched to the police station against the pass laws. The police opened fire on them, killing 67 people and wounding 186 others, including 40 women and 8 children. More than 80 per cent of them were shot in the back while fleeing. During the declaration of the state of emergency in 1960, which continued intermittently for nearly 30 years, anyone could be detained without a hearing by a low-level police official for up to six months. Thousands of individuals died in custody, frequently after gruesome acts of torture. Those who were tried were sentenced to death, banished, or imprisoned for life, as was the case with the world's most famous prisoner, Nelson Mandela. The issue of the policies of apartheid of the Government of South Africa remained on the agenda of the United Nations for almost fifty years. After numerous efforts of urging the Government of that country to abandon its policies - declared a crime against humanity - the international campaign reached a watershed in 1989. That year, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a Declaration on Apartheid and its Destructive Consequences in Southern Africa, paving the way for the holding of the April 1994 historic and first-ever democratic elections in South Africa. The United Nations Photo Library (http://www.un.org/av/photo/) holds a collection of approximately 800,000 photographs dating back to the mid-1940s chronicling the history of the Organization and its work. The collection includes coverage of historic UN meetings and events, as well as a wide array of field coverage from its earliest days." https://www.flickr.com/photos/un_photo/albums/72157614394196

Source: UN/Flickr

Uploaded by RFrost on 2016-01-23

Hector Pieterson Memorial, Soweto, South Africa, Jan 2015

Hector Pieterson Memorial, Soweto, South Africa, Jan 2015

Taken on 2015-01-16

Monument in honor of the Soweto uprising of 1976

Uploaded by ogkzebs on 2015-03-02

Frederik de Klerk with Nelson Mandela 1992

Frederik de Klerk with Nelson Mandela 1992

Taken on 1992-01-15

Frederik de Klerk and Nelson Mandela shake hands at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum held in Davos in January 1992.

Source: World Economic Forum

Uploaded by MicroscopeLens on 2014-06-09

Hector Pieterson Death, Soweto, Jun 1976

Hector Pieterson Death, Soweto, Jun 1976

Taken on 1976-06-16

Antoinette Sithole and Mbuyisa Makhubo carrying and 12-year-old Hector Pieterson moments after he was shot by South African police during a peaceful student demonstration in Soweto, South Africa

Source: Dzambukira, Proud/Wikipedia

Uploaded by mfa1988 on 2015-01-11